Doug Mitchell, JD

Principal

Loveland, CO

6125 Sky Pond Drive Suite 200 Loveland, Colorado 80538

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As a tax and estate attorney to successful business owners and their families for more than 20 years, Doug Mitchell designs sophisticated tax strategies involving complex charitable and estate-planning structures. To have the greatest positive impact, he begins working with people during their income-producing years, then increasingly through their retirement and as they transfer their assets to the next generation.

Doug is often called upon to help people as they face difficult situations such as the sudden illness or loss of a loved one, usually someone heavily involved in the family business. With his deep business knowledge and unique empathy level, he proves a caring and invaluable confidant as he guides surviving family members through maintaining the continuity of their operations with minimal disruptions. This is essential whether they plan to ultimately keep or liquidate their business, either of which he skillfully attends to.

Some examples of how Doug helps business owners and their families include:

  • Mitigating the short-term and long-term tax effects for a shareholder in an oil and gas business when the sale of an asset resulted in a $40 million increase in income, enabling the transfer of millions, tax free, to his heirs.
  • Planning for the smooth transition of a $15 million family farm from one generation to the next by setting up ownership structures that provide income and voting rights according to family members’ level of involvement in the farming operation.
  • Building a strategy for first-generation owners of a Kansas agricultural equipment manufacturer that preserved wealth of $32 million through estate-planning vehicles, as well as using a testamentary charitable plan to potentially eliminate estate tax liability for the owners’ heirs.

After earning his law degree, Doug pursued a master’s degree in taxation and practiced law in Denver before joining the firm in 2013. Years of practical experience solving families’ wealth management and succession challenges equip Doug to thoughtfully analyze alternative solutions from multiple angles. Particularly important are his considerations of the economic impact on each individual and the effect that certain structures might have on family harmony.

Education

  • L.L.M., taxation, University of Denver College of Law
  • J.D., law, Western Michigan University Cooley Law School
  • B.A., marketing, University of Colorado, Boulder

Public Speaking

  • Estate planning or blended families, 2012
  • Business disputes and buy sell agreements, Northwestern Mutual, 2010

Professional Associations

  • AV® Preeminent Peer Rating Martindale Hubbell
  • State Bar of Colorado, the U.S. District court, District of Colorado, and the U.S. Tax Court
  • American, Colorado, Denver, and Douglas County Bar Associations
  • Rocky Mountain Estate Planning Council and Colorado Planned Giving Roundtable

Civic Associations

  • Church finance council

Personal

  • Spending time with family
  • Golfing
  • Reading

Mentions and articles by Doug

Kansas Tax Bill SB 30—Big Changes Are Coming

K·Coe Editorial | June 12, 2017

Kansas legislators have voted to override Republican Governor, Sam Brownback’s veto of a tax bill, SB 30, that would repeal or roll back past income tax cuts he has championed. SB 30 is expected to raise $1.2 billion over two […]

Tax Increase Likely For Farmers Under New IRS Regulations

K·Coe Editorial | August 17, 2016

Newly proposed IRS regulations aiming to eliminate discounts used in popular types of estate planning could result in higher taxes for farmers who transfer ownership of their business to the next generation. That’s according to an analysis by Doug Mitchell […]

Uncertainty in economics, politics makes estate planning critical

K·Coe Editorial | March 8, 2016

Risk and uncertainty in the economy, changes in tax policy and pressure from foreign and domestic sources buying up farms means one thing: You have to have a plan for the future. Questions are out there. There’s no crystal ball, […]